De Profundis

The Sacred and the Profane

centuriespast:

Saint Thomas of Villanueva Giving Alms to the Poor, c. 1678
Bartolomé-Esteban Murillo
Spanish, 1617-1682Oil on canvas52-1/8 x 30 in. (132.4 x 76.2 cm)The Norton Simon Foundation

centuriespast:

Saint Thomas of Villanueva Giving Alms to the Poor, c. 1678

Bartolomé-Esteban Murillo

Spanish, 1617-1682
Oil on canvas
52-1/8 x 30 in. (132.4 x 76.2 cm)
The Norton Simon Foundation

paysagemauvais:

Judith with the Head of Holofernes, detail - Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640)circa 1616oil on canvas120 cm x 111 cmHerzog Anton Ulrich Museum, Braunschweig, Lower Saxony.

paysagemauvais:

Judith with the Head of Holofernes, detail - Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640)
circa 1616
oil on canvas
120 cm x 111 cm
Herzog Anton Ulrich Museum, Braunschweig, Lower Saxony.

c0ssette:

The Suicide of Lucretia by Joos van Cleve Flemish,1520-25 (Detail)
The story of the rape of Lucretia was one of the best-known episodes in the early history of Rome. It told how Sextus Tarquinius, brutal son of the tyrannical king, forced the virtuous wife Lucretia to accede to his lust by threatening that he would kill both her and her servant-boy if she refused, and afterwards claim that he had discovered them together in the act of adultery. To prevent this dishonour to her husband and family, Lucretia permitted herself to be raped, and was thereby able to tell her story and demand vengeance before she committed suicide.
Lucretia is portrayed at three-quarter length with the upper body bared to reveal her breasts spilling from precious fabrics and with jewellery draped across her naked skin. The female figure convey an immediate impression of beauty and luxury.

c0ssette:

The Suicide of Lucretia by Joos van Cleve Flemish,1520-25 (Detail)

The story of the rape of Lucretia was one of the best-known episodes in the early history of Rome. It told how Sextus Tarquinius, brutal son of the tyrannical king, forced the virtuous wife Lucretia to accede to his lust by threatening that he would kill both her and her servant-boy if she refused, and afterwards claim that he had discovered them together in the act of adultery. To prevent this dishonour to her husband and family, Lucretia permitted herself to be raped, and was thereby able to tell her story and demand vengeance before she committed suicide.

Lucretia is portrayed at three-quarter length with the upper body bared to reveal her breasts spilling from precious fabrics and with jewellery draped across her naked skin. The female figure convey an immediate impression of beauty and luxury.

afro-textured-art:

Gondar Homiliary

This Homiliary was created in Gondar, Ethiopia, during a period of artistic flowering in the late seventeenth century. The text, a Homiliary focused on the Miracles of the Archangel Michael, combines liturgical readings with forty-nine brightly colored renderings of God, St. Michael, and the miracles related in the text. The artists were likely trained as painters, rather than solely as manuscript illuminators, and their art can therefore be linked stylistically to contemporary mural painting.

Creator: Zämänfäs Qeddus (Scribe)

Late 17th century (early Gondarine)

(Each image have an individual caption, click on them to read. The images are not in any particular order)